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Dispassionate in the Present

One time when the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī, at Jeta’s grove in Anāthapindika’s park, he said this to the mendicants:

  • One’s faculty of sight, whether of the past, present or future, is impermanent. Seeing it thus, the learned noble disciple lets go of the faculty of sight as it was in the past, and does not look forward to how it will be in the future.
  • That noble disciple endeavours to become disillusioned and dispassionate towards the faculty of sight in the present.
  • The same applies to the faculties of sound, smell, taste, touch and mind: in the past, present or future they are impermanent. Seeing it thus, the learned noble disciple lets go of these faculties as they were in the past, and does not look forward to how they will be in the future.
  • That noble disciple endeavours to become disillusioned and dispassionate towards them in the present.
  • Therefore, one’s faculty of sight, in both the past and future as well as the present, is unsatisfactory and should not be regarded as oneself.
  • Seeing it thus, mendicants, the learned noble disciple lets go of the faculty of sight as it was in the past, and does not look forward to how it will be in the future.
  • That noble disciple endeavours to become disillusioned and dispassionate towards the faculty of sight in the present.
  • The same applies to the faculties of sound, smell, taste, touch and mind: in both the past, present future, they are unsatisfactory and should not be regarded as oneself.
  • Seeing it thus, a learned noble disciple lets go of these faculties as they were in the past, and does not look forward to how they will be in the future.
  • That noble disciple endeavours to become disillusioned and dispassionate towards them in the present.

SN 35.7-9


Self
December 8, 2019

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